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YMCA announces additions to leadership team

05.01.2019

danielle bryan RYMCA of Bucks County recently announced additions to their leadership team in the Central and Upper Bucks regions. On April 1, Bryan Detweiler was appointed the vice president of operations in the Upper Bucks region and Danielle Cioffi, vice president of operations in the Central Bucks region of Bucks County.  

Detweiler, a native to Quakertown and graduate of Quakertown Community High School, received his bachelor’s degree at Lock Haven University and master’s from Slippery Rock University. Most recently employed by the Ford Performance Racing School as a Race Shop and Operations Manager, Detweiler recently returned to his roots in Upper Bucks County with his wife and children. With an outstanding leadership reputation and a passion for sports, Detweiler is a welcomed addition to the Quakertown branch.

While not new to YMCA of Bucks County, Cioffi recently moved into the new leadership position helming the Central Bucks region after serving as the branch executive of the Fairless Hills and Newtown branches of the organization. She received her bachelor’s degree at Concordia University and a master’s at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Before serving the YMCA of Bucks County, Cioffi was employed by The Gateway Family YMCA in New Jersey as the district executive director overseeing two branch operations. She resides in Franklin Park, New Jersey with her husband and children.

YMCA of Bucks County is a charitable, nonprofit organization committed to strengthening communities through membership and programs that foster youth development, healthy living and social responsibility for all. Annually, the Y serves nearly 60,600 members and participants at its five member branches, five youth education centers, and ten camp locations across Bucks County. YMCA of Bucks County provides $5 million of community impact annually in the form of financial assistance to individuals and families in need and free programming for veterans, cancer survivors, older adults and more.